Hundreds Of Companies Unite Against Restrictive Voter Laws

Hundreds of companies and CEOs have added their signatures to a letter published opposing “any discriminatory legislation or measures that restrict or prevent any eligible voter from having an equal and fair opportunity to cast a ballot.”

The statement, published in a two-page ad in The New York Times and Washington Post, represents the largest collection of business leaders, lawyers, and non-profits to voice their opposition to restrictive voting laws and Republican efforts to pass them across the US.

The statement was organized by Kenneth Chenault, a former chief executive of American Express, and Kenneth Frazier, the chief executive of Merck, and includes such notable signatories as General Motors, Netflix, Starbucks, Amazon, Google, and Warren Buffet.

In the last few weeks, businesses have started voicing opposition to a new voting law in Georgia. Since then, many others have chimed in against it and similar efforts.

Many Republicans, including former President Donald Trump, have pushed back, calling for the corporations and their chiefs to stay out of politics and accusing businesses of siding with the Democratic Party.

While the list of companies that signed on to the letter is extensive, some notable corporations are absent. Coca-Cola and Delta, both based in Georgia, released earlier statements in regards to that states’ voting legislation but chose not to sign on to this statement.

Walmart’s C.E.O. Doug McMillion sent a note to employees explaining the company’s absence. “We are not in the business of partisan politics.”

Although we didn’t sign the letter, “we do want to be clear that we believe broad participation and trust in the election process are vital to its integrity,” Mr. McMillon said.

 

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